The China Post

2010.10.22 Friday

わたしをとりあげた記事は
世界のあちこちで確認できるようですが
The China Postに、
10月18日掲載されています。

Japanese photographer celebrates "forgotten Japan"


By Takehiko Kambayashi, dpa


   Onomichi, Japan (dpa) - In 2004, photographer Noriko Nakamoto

became enchanted by the serene atmosphere of the once-prosperous port

city of Onomichi and started to document what she calls the

"forgotten Japan."

   Disillusioned with relationships and burnt out from working in an

urban centre, Nakamoto, 34, decided to move to this western Japanese

city and spent more than five years capturing images of its scenery,

old temples, fish peddlers, homely eateries and ramshackle dwellings

on steep slopes.

   While Onomichi, which includes several small islands in the Seto

Inland Sea, is unknown even to many Japanese, visitors can cherish

good old Japan and take stock of their lives, she says.

   "Many people in Japan have forgotten what is really important in

life," Nakamoto says.

   Nakamoto, who has seldom worked for celebrities or big

corporations, focused her work on the daily lives of the locals and

their city, until she was almost broke and could no longer pay her

rent. But her experience enriched her life, she says.

   Onomichi is "like a treasure trove. I've been digging here for

five years and am still able to find what I think is treasure," she

says. "Unlike grey uniformity in neighbouring industrial cities,

Onomichi can provide different perspectives and rhythms. I've been

thrilled by the city's surroundings and different culture."

   The city, however, is located in one of the most conservative

regions in this unapologetically male-dominated country. Locals often

ask Nakamoto about her age and marital status rather than about her

work.

   "I'm used to it," she says, beaming.

   In her teens, Nakamoto was often considered "different" among her

peers in a society which prizes conformity. While many students were

keen to meet the pressure to excel, she was reluctant to go to

school, but loved to draw pictures, write poems and read books and

manga.

   Today, Nakamoto has taught photography to physically challenged

people and been an instructor for more than 100 locals.

   Kazuyoshi Inukai, a hospital worker, is one of her students.

   "Nobody had ever commended my photos. But she did from day one. I

was so delighted," he says. "She also impressed me when she said,

'There is no answer in photography because everyone has different

perspectives.'"

   Kohei Oi, another student, now does some freelance photography for

a major daily.

   "I used to walk with my head down, but after I started to take

photos, I often look at the sky," Oi, a college student, says. "I

also see things more carefully when taking photos."

   Another draw are the people populating Onomichi, many of them

reminiscent of characters out of a movie, Nakamoto says.

   One of them, she says, is Koki Yamane, an energetic local business

leader who runs eight Japanese-style pubs in the region.

   Yamane says he wants to create more job opportunities so that

young people won't have to leave.

   "After travelling around the country, I came to believe Onomichi

is a really good place to live," he says. "This place has strong ties

among its people. Business owners here not only seek profits but also

think of this community as a whole."

   Like many other parts of Japan, Onomichi has to deal with the

effects of its greying population. For example, its hillsides are

dotted with an increasing number of vacant properties. More older

people have been moving out of the area as they find it difficult to

climb the slopes every day.

   Moreover, as Japan's decades-long economic downturn has hit its

provinces especially hard, more people have abandoned their hometowns

to seek work in a big city.

   "Many people have forgotten what their hometown has given them,"

Nakamoto says.


_________________________________________


ちょっと長い記事なので翻訳を掲載します。


「忘れられた日本」を称賛するフォトグラファー


dpa特派員・神林毅彦


日本、尾道市

2004年、フォトグラファー・中元紀子はかつて港町として栄えた尾道が持つ穏やかな表情に魅せられ、彼女いわく「ふるさと(忘れられた日本)」を撮り始めた。

 都市での人間関係に幻滅、仕事にも疲れ果てていた中元は、西日本のこの町に移り住むことを決め、5年間以上もの間、その風景、古い寺、魚を売り歩く行商人、町の食堂、坂に立つ古い家々などを撮り続けた。

 瀬戸内海のいくつかの小さな島も含む尾道市は、多くの日本人にさえあまり知られていないが、訪れる人は古き良き日本を見つけることができ、今までの人生を振り返ることができるのでは、と中元は言う。

 「人生でほんとうに何が大切かということを忘れてしまっている人は多いと思います」

 中元は、有名人や大企業の仕事はほとんどしてきてなく、尾道とこの町の人々の生活をお金がほとんどなくなり、家賃が払えなくなるまで撮り続けた。しかし、尾道の経験から得たものを彼女の人生を豊かなものにしたと言う。

 「尾道は宝の山のような場所なんです。5年間も掘り続けてきたけど、いまだに宝ものを見つけることができるのです。近くの同じような都市とは異なり、尾道は異なった側面やリズムを提供してくれます。この環境と異なった文化に感動をおぼえます」

 しかし、尾道は男性社会の日本でも最も保守的な地域に一つに位置している。地元の人々のなかには彼女の作品ではなく、彼女の歳や結婚歴を聞いてくる人もいる。

 「もう、慣れていますよ」と中元は笑みを浮かべて言う。

 和が強調される日本社会において、中元は、十代の頃、同級生からは「異なっている」と見られていた。多くの同級生が良い成績を残さなくてはいけないと考えていたが、彼女は学校に行くこと自体、気が進まなかった。しかし、絵を描いたり、本やマンガを読んだり、詩を書くことが大好きだった。

 

 今では、100人以上の地元の人々や障害を持つ人々に写真を教えている。

 犬飼和喜は中元に学ぶ一人だ。

 「今まで私の写真を褒めてくれた人は一人もいませんでした。でも、中元さんは初日から私の写真を褒めてくれました。とても嬉しく思いました。中元さんは『一人一人ものの見方が異なるので、写真に答えなどありません』と話してくれたことは印象的でした」

 もう一人の生徒、大学生の大井康平は新聞社に自分の写真を売るまでになっている。

 「以前は下を向きながら歩いていることが多かったのですが、写真を撮りだしてから、良く、空を見ます。また、以前よりも、ものをよく見るようになりました」

 尾道の別の魅力は、映画の登場人物のような人がこの町には少なくないことだと中元は言う。

 この地域で居酒屋など8店舗を経営するエネルギッシュな山根浩揮はその一人で、地元の若手のリーダー的存在でもある。

山根はこの地域の雇用機会を増やしたいと話す。そうすれば、若い人たちもこの地域から出ていかないだろう。

 「国内の色々なところを見てきて、やはり、尾道はほんとうにいい町だと思うようになりました。この町は人々の結びつきが強く、経営者も自分たちの利益だけを追うのではなく、町全体のことを考えながら仕事をしています」

 しかし、尾道は、日本の多くの場所同様、高齢化の影響に対処しなくてはいけない。

市の山側斜面には空き家が増えてきている。日々、その坂を上り下りするのが困難になる高齢者がこの地域から出ていくためだという。

そのうえ、長年にわたる不況は地方を直撃していて、都市で仕事を求めるために故郷を去る人は増えている。

 中元は言う。

 「ふるさとが与えてくれたものを忘れてしまっている人が多いと思います」

 

関連する記事
コメント
感慨深い記事ですね。
わんちゃんさんやコーへくんのお話はそのまま自分にあてはまります。NORiさんが先生でよかったと思える瞬間でもあります。
  • by Reicy
  • 2010/10/23 10:38 AM
わたしもその言葉に救われます。
教えることは、より自分が教わることでもあり、
役に立つことの喜びを知りました。
有り難いことです。
  • by NORi
  • 2010/10/27 10:11 PM
コメントする